21 Ways to Get Known, Liked and Trusted Internationally

21 Ways to Get Known, Liked and Trusted Internationally

Most business owners and marketing and sales executives don’t listen to their customers or communicate with them – unless those customers speak some English.

Many proudly announce themselves as a global company but when it comes to language translation and providing information in the foreign audiences’ native language, the answers I receive are less inclusive.

Did you know that over 50% of internet users at a research study said they would not buy a product online if the information is not presented in their native language?

The world is getting smaller, calling, emailing, messaging, and traveling goes faster across the globe. Websites are born internationally and can pop up in search engines globally, right? Advertisement algorithms are so sophisticated and social media is reaching every worldly corner to post easily. With reviews and social proof everybody can find the best options. But does this global access creates enough trust in consumers to pop in their credit card info and click buy?

Today, everybody can make themselves known, liked and trusted – so important to make sales and good profits. Many companies simply ignore the importance of making their content available in their customers’ language(s) and initiating two-way-conversations.

Don’t let the language barrier scare you and let sales slip away.

Here you can find 21 ways to master the Know-Like-Trust factor to make yourself found and known and liked and trusted beyond your immediate fan circle and become a real international company – and making more sales overseas.

Stand out and become KNOWN with the following strategies:

  1. Get clear on your audience: Same as in your country, define your target audience or narrow down and focus on a group to test the waters of foreign language communication.
  2. Learn some customs and cultural significances of that target audience (such as holidays, gestures and logistic exceptions).
  3. Translate relevant content pieces for that target audience in their native language.
  4. Translate your lead magnet into the target country language to stand out with your offer. And not only that, you get email addresses in exchange and can potentially communicate directly.
  5. Interview an expert of that country, translate the questions and answers.
  6. Write a guest blog for a relevant blog in that country (translate your guest post).
  7. Not just translate keywords and SEO-alt-tags – allow some research to adopt them to your business and goals, so the right people can find you.

 

Following are ways to make yourself ‘LIKED’ beyond that ‘like’ button

  1. Respond to reviews (in the reviewer’s language) to make them feel heart.
  2. Build relationships and engage actively to nurture likeability (in their language – yes, find this translator to partner and be your voice in another language).
  3. Show your face, be visible – even with subtitles on videos, people can relate better that way.
  4. Be nice, be customer service … yes, in German, French or the language that your customers speak
  5. Listen – research – ask questions in their language.
  6. Consider traveling in a foreign country and get in person with your Likers and Fans
  7. Attend international events outside your native country

 

Trust, being TRUSTED, the secret ingredient for people to buy into your services or products

  1. Don’t disappoint or frustrate your website visitors – deliver what you promise or communicate what is in their language and what not
  2. Be consistent: even if you can’t translate your complete brand, marketing material, etc. – yet show consistency across one channel
  3. Post those foreign language testimonials
  4. Translate one or so case studies to show your expertise
  5. Don’t use Machine Translation uncontrolled
  6. Translate at least key elements such as shopping carts, show their currencies
  7. Offer guarantees and trials (translate that info)

Yes, all those ways mostly relate to and involve strategically translating your voice, your message, your copy, your brand into your customers’ native language.

Is that approach new to you? Did you think about but are not sure how and where to start? Are you not trusting Google Translate (that’s in most cases a good thing) or even not any human translator to find your voice in another language? Are the costs of translating your content too high?

Our website and blog [un]translatable is dedicated almost entirely to shine a light on the aspects of growing your business beyond borders, communicating authentically with your foreign language audience, getting more customers and making more sales.

Come back regularly or stay in touch with signing up for our weekly email.

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“Customers buy experiences, not products.” – Is that also true for Germans?

“Customers buy experiences, not products.” – Is that also true for Germans?

 

We all heard the saying “Customers buy experiences, not products.” And what seems so obvious when everybody around you speaks the language you are reading right now, is not so obvious for the over 90 % of internet users whose first language is not English. After the visual first impression, the second impression is the words you are reading on a website. Then, the focus is directed toward your product or service. With bridging some cultural customs and language gaps you can stand out in a busy marketplace.

Observing

During the first quarter of this year, we were consumed by new wonderful clients launching their products and services in Germany. Working frantically on translating and localizing their website, email campaigns, optimizing content for search engines, reviewing video documentation and subtitles – all the while understanding the deep impact their powerful messages would have on people and the trust they put in us with translating their messages into German…

Reflecting

Reflecting on the work in the evenings, I made notes on what worked well during the day’s activities and what less, on observations with clients and thoughts on their customers and solutions – massive realizations that usually flow through me, especially when I am very involved in activities.
All that gave rise to the idea of creating a new email series that would focus on essential areas of a website or online presence that – due to cultural reasons or basic human reactions when consuming information in order to know or buy – are key for nurturing an audience… and when optimizing those ‘sweet spots’, they can increase sales.

Hypothesizing

However, that is a hypothesis. A hypothesis that I would like to test with business owners that currently already sell products or service in Germany (or other countries), or that would like to carve out their market share in a foreign country.
How can I test that? After all, it’s America and ‘time is money’ and usually scarce…

Testing together

Well, I thought, I could create something that even when the hypothesis is incorrect, would not be a loss but still a win.
So, we would spend some quality time together, we would both or all gain more knowledge on a topic of mutual interest and if the hypothesis is correct, increase sales and profit of our businesses – each individual one.

That sounded pretty good to me.

Therefore, I invite you to join in!

I created my new series in the form of a challenge! Why? First, I like challenges, especially those together with others. The energy of a challenge is one that accelerates efforts. There is a goal to reach, in the near future.
Let’s do that.

If it resonates with you and your current business, I invite you to sign up for the challenge and receive 10 emails over a period of 2 weeks (no emails on weekends). The content will be short and actionable. You can share your results and thoughts with me, of course, ask me questions and receive answers.
Every week, I will have a live Q&A session that you might join or watch as a replay on my Facebook page.
So let’s get started:

 

Seasonal Greetings for your International Customers

Seasonal Greetings for your International Customers

Imagine, you spend a wonderful vacation in a far away city, ate in a nice restaurant, had an adventurous time with a rented bike, took an RV to cross the country, you bought a special souvenir in a store, or took a guided tour or learned cooking overseas … and then, in the mail, you receive a Christmas card from that other country and it wishes you Christmas in their language and in yours, it’s even personalized with your name or another special note that tells you, they mean YOU.

Imagine, you have a local ethnic community that buys your products and services, are your guests and visitors. Can you show them gratitude in a similar way?

Christmas and New Year cards are displayed during the holiday season, the time of giving, next to your other Christmas cards. How many time during that Christmas time did you think of that service, product, the people you met there, the memories? Quite often.

Take that hour or two to thank those who made your (business) day, and show gratitude in their language.

I put together for you a sheet with saying “Merry Christmas” and “Happy New Year” in many of the European languages for you to send a personalized note if you wish. Enter your email here and we will send the paper to you.

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Tree Lighting with an Attitude

Tree Lighting with an Attitude

Christmas tree lighting in the US is done in almost every town and city in the US and most Europe around the first Advent. Adding Lights (also known as Fairy lights) to a needle tree goes back to the 18th century Germany where Christmas trees were decorated in upper-class homes with candles which symbolizes Christ being the light of the world. Displaying the trees publicly became popular in the early 20th century, candles were exchanged for electrical lighting.

Adding a tree to your business property and creating a lightning ceremony can become a wonderful annual tradition to your customers, visitors, and people who work for you. There is a gentle touch, a warm light that can bring all people coming in contact with it into a holiday mood of your considerate creation, leading up to Christmas Eve and Day with Christ-in-mass’ or Christ-consciousness.

12 Culture Nuggets for Business Travel in Italy

12 Culture Nuggets for Business Travel in Italy

Being in Italy, exactly in Catona, Calabria, for the first time, gives me a good reason to write about specifics of the south Italian everyday life and hints of thoughts for fellow travelers with formal reasons, such as business. I am in good company with my Italian-born American husband visiting my parents in law and, therefore, experiencing Italian culture as close as it gets in becoming part of an Italian family. Without further ado:

1. Hospitality
Hospitality plays a key role in the Italian culture, also the business culture. Home-made drinks and the delicious home-made food is offered. Invitations are not refused and allow time to know each other better.

2. Narrowing streets
Villages and cities are grown organically over hundreds of years and space are limited. When the streets were built, there were no cars yet, now cars parked left and right. Streets become one-lane-streets (with two-way traffic). When renting a car, get full coverage, it’s worth your peace of mind. When using your US-bought GPS or GPS app be nice to it as it’s working hard to identify and pronouncing the tiny twisty streets with some difficulties in defining left and right.

3. Small cars and micro driving
Narrow streets call for tiny cars, small cars, more an extension of arms and legs. As crazy and rule-ignoring it might seem for Americans or Germans, Italians are good drivers in my opinion. They know how to drive the narrow, one-lane streets and hills and watch for humans, especially kids – as pedestrian walkways often are non-existent. Waving ‘hello’, entering a steep curve or street is done with the horn … How to adapt? Drive with your gut, not with your head, there is more room to a tiny street than you think.

4. The midday siesta
Streets and people are busy until noon or 1 pm, then cities and towns become quiet and empty. It is time for a lunch and the midday rest afterward. People disappear from streets, stores are closing, street fairs get broken down (yes, I saw it!). Only cafes, restaurants, gelaterias and such are open. Quiet time everywhere … until about 4 pm in the afternoon when everything comes back to life (fair boots get built up again).
You can’t do business during those times, best you just do the same. It might feel awkward to not be able to do anything, yet after two days, it seems natural – and actually feels good.

5. Passeggiata and getting together
Walking through the streets at around 6 pm gives a picture quite unknown to Americans. In courts and alleys, people sit together and talk, they stand at street corners and sit on banks in parks and marinas. They talk, they go for walks, and they just lean out of the window and watch people. They just are, aware of the surroundings, ready to be seen. For the time being there, if you haven’t before, just follow one such activity as a routine, and you will watch the meaning of this casual togetherness growing every day and allowing the space for things to happen.

6. Shopping
Shopping is different for there are still much more individual stores: shoe store, clothing store, bags, bakeries, butcher stores, tobacco and news store, pharmacy etc. And for going in a store, attention is individualized and secluded. Even in the smallest town, there is a fine dresses boutique: families are large and marriages and birthdays, communion, etc. are more frequently and elegant robes needed more frequently. Appearance is very important. There is a dress code in business; appearance stands in relation to success and competence. And remember: everything is closed for the midday break, and shut down at 6 to 8 pm, no business on Sunday, Catholic festivities and national holidays.

7. The garbage in the streets
In parts of Italy (usually those regions with less tourism) is lots of garbage. On the beach, across a beautiful house, next to tourism beach bars, in the streets, on picnic sites in the forest – and I mean lots of garbage.
At home, there is a strict recycling separation of garbage, yet the attitude stops behind the door, an attitude that no law can regulate. Sadly, learn to watch away and ignore it. And make sure you don’t add to it.

8. Greetings
Meeting families or friends in the street greet each other with kisses left and right on the cheeks. Older persons and women will always be introduced first. People well known may become a warm embrace, also in business settings. In general and everywhere greet with “Buongiorno” (good morning) and “Buonasera” (good afternoon/evening), it’s a polite manner. Business partners shake hands, always in a standing position, with each individual person (no waving to the group).

9. The Italian language
Hand-gestured, expressively pronounced discussions.
With astonishment, I observed my Italian-born now American husband. When he talks in English or with us in German, he has this down-to-earth, neutral (beautiful) voice. However, observing him talking his favorite topic with his cousins and extended friends, he transforms into that full-body expressive gesturing being with a lively voice whose sound alone speaks (even if you don´t know the language).
Italians use most likely the most of the body language of all European countries. I actually decided to bring some of that expressive character over into my English and German language. How would your speech change with more emotional emphasis and expression? Speaking simultaneous and interrupting – also during business meetings – is part of the Italian communication style.

10. Respect, status, and hierarchy
Status and hierarchy are essential in Italian society, power and age are highly respected, and much attention is also given to children. Building close and trusting relationships is very important in Italian’s business culture. A well-connected person can make the right introduction for you.

11. The food
Food is socializing. Food is, of course, different in the various regions of Italy, food
reflects the various life situations of the people. Often, people were poor and used what they had on pasta and vegetable and fruits and spices out of their gardens. It was not a fancy cuisine as it seems sometimes nowadays. What really stroke me was the fresh pasta: what a difference. It is definitely worth the extra work of making and cleaning up the machine afterward. Even a simple menu starts with antipasti and bread, then there is a pasta dish, after that the meat is served – by itself on the plate or with salad and vegetables – then there is fruits or dessert. Hint: hold yourself back at the delicious antipasti and the pasta dish as you don’t know what’s still coming to the table. Business meetings over lunch can take up to three hours.

12. Coffee Espresso
A small espresso or a lungo espresso are both small – compared to American’s grande or venti size coffees. However, the brewing method and the essential strength of it feels satisfying and enough for the hours to come. Even a little sugar soothes the strength and supports the effectiveness. “Latte” is the Italian word for milk, so no shortcuts in ordering your drink (unless you want indeed milk.

 

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